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Wisconsin Department of Transportation

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Newsline audio releases – March 6, 2015

Listed below are MP3 audio files and the text of actualities and wraps associated with WisDOT's Radio Newsline.

This weekend, we set our clocks ahead one hour. Larry Corsi (core-see) with WisDOT’s Bureau of Transportation Safety says it also requires that we readjust our travel habits.

Cut 1: Larry Corsi, Bureau of Transportation Safety (299 KB/19 seconds)

“For a lot of drivers it will be dark as they make their morning commute. Allow a little extra time for travel in the coming days. Pedestrians and bicyclists are also getting used to the time change and may not be as conscious about decisions they’re making. The dark conditions will put them at greater risk of not being seen by motorists. They should wear retro-reflective or bright colored clothing to be more visible.”

Cut 2: Larry Corsi, Bureau of Transportation Safety (251 KB/16 seconds)

“Bikers and pedestrians also may be a bit sleep-deprived from the time change. They, too, need to remember to pay extra attention as they leave the house in dark conditions. Make certain motorists see you before crossing the street or entering an intersection, and use lights, along with wearing retro-reflective or bright colored clothing.”

Cut 3: Wrap with Corsi (702 KB/45 seconds)

It’s time to spring ahead this weekend. Daylight Saving Time begins Sunday at 2 a.m. Larry Corsi with the Wisconsin DOT’s Bureau of Transportation Safety says along with setting your clocks ahead one hour, people should also adjust their travel habits.

“For a lot of drivers it will be dark as they make their morning commute. Allow a little extra time for travel in the coming days. Pedestrians and bicyclists are also getting used to the time change and may not be as conscious about decisions they’re making. The dark conditions will put them at greater risk of not being seen by motorists. They should wear retro-reflective or bright colored clothing to be more visible.”

On the brighter side, daylight will remain an hour longer, providing additional visibility for many commuters as they head home. This is Rob Miller reporting.

Winter weather can limit a driver’s vision, meaning it’s very important to keep your vehicle’s windows clear of snow, frost and ice. Lieutenant Karl Mittelstadt with the Wisconsin State Patrol says it’s also a good idea to sweep snow off your vehicle’s hood, roof and trunk.

Cut 1: Lt. Karl Mittelstadt, State Patrol (373 KB/24 seconds)

“State law requires motorists to keep vehicle windows reasonably clean at all times so you can see what’s going on around you. In the wintertime, it means drivers need to scrape or brush away snow, frost, ice from all windows before heading out on the road. It’s really a public safety issue. If you can’t adequately see out your windows, you could easily pull out in front of another vehicle or strike a pedestrian.”

Cut 2: Lt. Karl Mittelstadt, State Patrol (359 KB/23 seconds)

“You should also take the time to brush snow off your vehicle’s hood, roof and trunk as the snow can start blowing around you as you’re going down the highway and impact your vision and other motorists’ vision. If you find yourself behind another vehicle that has snow or ice blowing off of it, it’s a good idea to just give it some extra room — maybe change lanes if you’re on a freeway and you can safely move over to another lane.”

Cut 3 : Wrap with Mittelstadt (955 KB/61 seconds)

Winter weather can impact motorists’ vision and it’s one reason that state law requires drivers to keep vehicle windows reasonably clean at all times. Wisconsin State Patrol Lieutenant Karl Mittelstadt says in the wintertime, this means always taking the time to scrape away snow and ice from vehicle windows before heading out on the road.

“You should also take the time to brush snow off your vehicle’s hood, roof and trunk as the snow can start blowing around you as you’re going down the highway and impact your vision and other motorists’ vision. If you find yourself behind another vehicle that has snow or ice blowing off of it, it’s a good idea to just give it some extra room — maybe change lanes if you’re on a freeway and you can safely move over to another lane.”

Another piece of advice from Lieutenant Mittelstadt — be sure to keep your vehicle’s window washer fluid reservoir full. A citation for failing to keep windows reasonably clean can cost you $175 and two demerit points. This is Rob Miller reporting.


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LLast modified: March 5, 2015

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