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Wisconsin Department of Transportation

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Newsline audio releases - August 1, 2014

Listed below are MP3 audio files and the text of actualities and wraps associated with WisDOT's Radio Newsline.

If your travel plans take you along I-90 or I-94, don’t be surprised to see additional law enforcement along the highways and possibly overhead. Lieutenant Colonel Brian Rahn with the Wisconsin State Patrol talks about the national “I-90/94 Challenge.”

Cut 1: Lt. Col. Brian Rahn, State Patrol (273 KB/17 seconds)

We’ll be keeping a sharp eye out for speeders, unbuckled motorists, and other traffic violations. And again, as always, our goal is not to write citations. We’re always hoping for voluntary compliance with traffic laws. Our real goal is to save lives, reduce crashes and reduce injuries.”

Cut 2: Lt. Col. Brian Rahn, State Patrol (438 KB/28 seconds)

“The I-90/94 Challenge is a national effort to raise awareness about traffic safety during the month of August which is historically one of the deadliest months here in the state of Wisconsin. In fact, the all-time deadliest month on WI roads occurred in August of 1969 when we saw 154 traffic deaths here in the state. We’re hoping that through enhanced law enforcement and education, we’ll get the motorists to slow down and be alert so that everyone travelling the highways can get to where they’re going safely.”

Cut 3: Wrap with Rahn (1090 KB/70 seconds)

From Massachusetts to Washington state, drivers should expect to see stepped-up law enforcement along Interstates 90 and 94. The Wisconsin State Patrol will have officers on the ground and in the air as part of the national “I-90/94 Challenge” that’s underway now through Monday. Wisconsin State Patrol Lieutenant Colonel Brian Rahn says the overall goal is highway safety.

“We’ll be keeping a sharp eye out for speeders, unbuckled motorists, and other traffic violations. And again, as always, our goal is not to write citations. We’re always hoping for voluntary compliance with traffic laws. Our real goal is to save lives, reduce crashes and reduce injuries.”

The national law enforcement effort takes place during what is traditionally a peak month for traffic deaths. Rahn says the all-time deadliest month on Wisconsin roads happened in August of 1969 when 154 people lost their lives in traffic crashes.

“We’re hoping that through enhanced law enforcement and education, we’ll get the motorists to slow down and be alert so that everyone travelling the highways can get to where they’re going safely.”

This is Rob Miller reporting.

Next week is “National Stop on Red Week.” Wisconsin State Patrol Sergeant Travis Lauer says obeying traffic signs and signals can be a matter of life or death.

Cut 1: Sgt. Travis Lauer, State Patrol (385 KB/25 seconds)

“Intersections are one of the most dangerous places drivers will encounter. They involve many complex movements. You’ve got vehicles entering, exiting and crossing — and then you add to that the possibility of pedestrians and bicyclists. Intersection crashes are often severe. Vehicles are often hit in the side where there’s less protection for drivers and passengers. So as you approach an intersection, ease up on your speed, and be especially alert and be ready to come to a complete stop.”

Cut 2: Sgt. Travis Lauer, State Patrol (296 KB/19 seconds)

“When a traffic signal turns yellow, it means drivers must stop, unless you’re so close to the intersection that they can’t stop safely. Don’t ever race through a yellow light to beat the red light. The best thing drivers can do — as you approach a signalized intersection — slow down a bit, provide some space between you and the vehicle in front of you, and be prepared to stop.”

Cut 3: Wrap with Lauer (1054 974/67 seconds)

Drivers who run a red light are taking some big risks. An expensive citation may be the least of your problems considering you could be injured, killed, while also risking the lives of other motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians. This is National Stop on Red Week. Wisconsin State Patrol Sergeant Travis Lauer says intersections are a common site for a crash especially if drivers aren’t careful.

“Intersections are one of the most dangerous places drivers will encounter. They involve many complex movements. You’ve got vehicles entering, exiting and crossing — and then you add to that the possibility of pedestrians and bicyclists. Intersection crashes are often severe. Vehicles are often hit in the side where there’s less protection for drivers and passengers. So as you approach an intersection, ease up on your speed, and be especially alert and be ready to come to a complete stop.”

Sergeant Lauer says when a traffic signal turns yellow, that means drivers must stop unless you’re so close to the intersection that you can’t stop safely. The best advice for drivers approaching an intersection is to slow down a bit, provide extra space between vehicles, and be prepared to stop. This is Rob Miller reporting.


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LLast modified: July 31, 2014

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