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Wisconsin Department of Transportation

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Newsline audio releases – March 27, 2015

Listed below are MP3 audio files and the text of actualities and wraps associated with WisDOT's Radio Newsline.

It’s that time of year when highway maintenance crews are repairing or replacing signs along state roadways. Matt Rauch with the Wisconsin DOT’s Bureau of Traffic Operations asks motorists to be watchful for roadway workers.

Cut 1: Matt Rauch, Bureau of Traffic Operations (371 KB/24 seconds)

“After a typical winter, we’ll see about 5,000 signs along the state highway system damaged by snowplows or by other vehicles. Along with damaged signs, we work with county highway crews to replace older signs with new signs that are more visible and reflective at night. So drivers should be alert for highway crews and others working along the roadways — and slow down, or move over a lane if possible.”

Cut 2: Matt Rauch, Bureau of Traffic Operations (292 KB/19 seconds)

“Overall, we have about 300,000 signs along the state highway system. It includes speed limit, directional, warning and guidance signs. Costs to replace the signs varies depending on size — anywhere from $250 for the smaller signs to up to $10,000 for a large sign."

Cut 3: Wrap with Rauch (780 KB/50 seconds)

Here’s another “sign” of spring. The Wisconsin DOT and county highway crews are busy repairing or replacing highway signs damaged by snowplows and other vehicles. This is Matt Rauch with the Wisconsin DOT’s Bureau of Traffic Operations.

“After a typical winter, we’ll see about 5,000 signs along the state highway system damaged by snowplows or by other vehicles. Along with damaged signs, we work with county highway crews to replace older signs with new signs that are more visible and reflective at night. So drivers should be alert for highway crews and others working along the roadways — and slow down, or move over a lane if possible.”

The state oversees about 300,000 signs along the state highway system including speed limit, directional, warning, and guidance signs. This is Rob Miller reporting.

Warmer spring weather means more bicyclists along Wisconsin roadways. Larry Corsi (core-see) with the Wisconsin DOT’s Bureau of Transportation Safety says preventing bike-related crashes is a dual responsibility between bicyclists and motorists. 

Cut 1: Larry Corsi, Bureau of Transportation Safety (304 KB/19 seconds)

“We want to remind bicyclists and motorists that safety on our roadway is a dual responsibility. Bikers should always wear a helmet, wear bright clothing and lights to make themselves as visible as possible. We ask motorists to be alert — to share the road — and be especially careful at intersections where crashes between bikes and motor vehicles often occur.”

Cut 2: Larry Corsi Bureau of Transportation Safety (280 KB/18 seconds)

“The most common time frame for crashes involving bicyclists is between 3 and 7 p.m. Those are the hours when students are leaving school — and when many adults are commuting home from work. But we know crashes can occur anytime. So we’re just asking bicyclists and other motorists to be patient and considerate — be safe and share the road.”

Cut 3: Wrap with Corsi (867 KB/55 seconds)

Bicyclists are taking advantage of the longer days, later sunsets, and warmer temperatures. Larry Corsi is the Wisconsin DOT’s Bike and Pedestrian Safety Coordinator. He says preventing bicycle crashes is a dual responsibility involving bicyclists and motorists.

“The most common time frame for crashes involving bicyclists is between 3 and 7 p.m. Those are the hours when students are leaving school — and when many adults are commuting home from work. But we know crashes can occur anytime. So we’re just asking bicyclists and other motorists to be patient and considerate — be safe and share the road.”

Bicyclists should obey traffic laws, wear helmets, bright-colored clothing and lights. Motorists should be alert for bicyclists especially at intersections where crashes between bikes and motor vehicles often occur. Last year, there were four bicyclists killed along Wisconsin roadways. This is Rob Miller reporting.


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LLast modified: March 26, 2015

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